What to expect from live events in the post-covid era

As the world starts to return to some kind of normal after the initial impact of COVID-19, getting back to the things we love doing is once again a possibility. For many people this includes live events, whether that’s festivals, comedy or gigs. Given the current rules on social distancing, and the need to avoid spreading COVID-19 in large crowds, changes have had to be made to accommodate this. Every event will be different but this is what you can expect from live events now if you’re lucky enough to go.

 

Get there early

 

The process of entry to any live event is going to be much more tightly organised now. Many are designating guests into pods so you’ll most likely be with the people you come with in a small group. If the show starts at 9pm you can expect to get there for 6pm and do some waiting. Many events are letting people in on a first come first served basis so the earlier you arrive the more likely it is you’ll be closer to the stage.

 

New conditions for arrival

 

You may be asked to arrive in a car, rather than on foot, and to stay in the car until it’s your turn to go into the venue, whether that’s your own car or a taxi. You can expect to have your temperature taken when you arrive at a live event and to be asked to use hand sanitiser.

 

Far less of a security pat down

 

Due to the social distancing rules any security at the venue won’t be able to make physical contact with you. So, rather than being searched or checked for drugs, alcohol etc you’ll be asked a series of questions instead. As many venues will be organising guests in small groups and keeping them separate you can expect security to be on hand to enforce this separation.

 

Different ways of getting to the bar

 

Being in a crush of a queue at the bar just isn’t going to happen with live events right now – and for many people that feels like a good thing. Instead, most venues are working out ways to bring booze to guests in their designated areas, whether that’s table service or a booze buggy.

 

A different atmosphere

 

It’s certainly going to feel different when you’re separated from other people in a small group, possibly seated, especially if it’s the kind of event you’d be keen to dance at. However, those who have gone to events with these arrangements in place have reported that people get used to them pretty quickly and dancing is still very much a thing – just with a bit more space.

 

The exits will be carefully managed

 

The exit moment after a live event when people have been drinking and everyone is keen to get home could potentially be the most challenging for organisers. So, you may be asked to wear a mask, keep a social distance and wait for a designated time to leave so that you don’t come into contact with others.

 

Live eventshave been put on hold for the time being but they will start to happen again and can be a great experience, albeit slightly different to what many of us might be have been used to in the past. It is up to event staging companies to adapt and innovate great ways to make live events possible for the future.

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About Us

Scott Fleary was officially founded in September 1993 by two friends Matthew Scott and Ken Fleary. They both had a dream to build high standard craftsmanship scenery for a wide spectrum entertainment and arts industry, using primary values - excellence and creativity.

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